Ayurveda is fast-becoming a preferred lifestyle option around the world, and it is poised for a quantum leap today as Western companies realize its potential and Western consumers realize its benefits. Ayurveda is the age-old science of well-being, which has the benefit of making consumers look younger and feel vibrant. ...

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Scientists at Sanford Burnham have identified the mechanism that causes muscle cells to stop regenerating as people age. This knowledge could lead to methods to slow—but not stop—the decline in muscle mass and function people experience as they get older. ...

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Among the complex determinants of aging, mitochondrial dysfunction has been in the spotlight for a long time. As the hub for many cellular functions, the maintenance of an adequate pool of functional mitochondria is crucial for tissue homeostasis. ...

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Calico’s logo is a labyrinth — fitting for the ultra-secretive company. Researchers are puzzled by Calico’s stealthiness and say it’s not good for science. ...

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As a topic for aging research, cellular senescence passed its tipping point a few years ago. Prior to that growth of interest and attention it was a struggle to raise funding for this area of work, and thus it didn't matter how compelling the evidence was for its involvement in the processes of aging. ...

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Ageing skeletal muscle undergoes chronic denervation, and the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the key structure that connects motor neuron nerves with muscle cells, shows increased defects with ageing. Previous studies in various species have shown that with ageing, type II fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres show more atrophy and NMJ deterioration than type I slow-twitch fibres. ...

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Decades ago, scientists surgically attached pairs of rats to each other and noticed that old rats tended to live longer if they shared a bloodstream with young rats. It was the beginning of a peculiar and ambitious scientific endeavor to understand how certain materials from young bodies, when transplanted into older ones, can sometimes improve or rejuvenate them. ...

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Scientists have known for a long time that the ability to repair broken strands of DNA is vital for cells to stay healthy and avoid irregularities like cancer. But they haven’t been able to pinpoint why that ability, like most things, breaks down with age — until the discovery of the molecule NAD. Dr. ...

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Third in an occasional series on how Harvard researchers are tackling the problematic issues of aging. “If only,” wrote an ancient Japanese poet, “when one heard that Old Age was coming one could bolt the door….” Science is working on it. Aging is as much about the physical processes of repair and regeneration — and their slow-motion failure — as it is the passage of time. ...

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An ortholog is a gene in one species that serves the same purpose as its equivalent in another species, a pairing that usually implies common ancestry. In the case of humans and nematode worms such as Caenorhabditis elegans, that is a very distant common ancestry, but nonetheless even between such widely diverse species many cellular mechanisms are surprisingly similar. ...

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